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In Like a Lamb

Hampshire ewes with her twin lambs

 

For us, rain, sleet, snow or shine, March always comes in like a lamb. We raise our own rams, Hampshire and Rambouillet, and the ewes start lambing March 1st. After the winter wait, the long months of lambs growing in the womb, we get to see these babies. With them lies our future. Their future, likewise, depends upon us. It is a long time between lambs on the ground and rams, dusted with iron oxide, jumping out of the horsetrailer to join the ewes, starting the cycle anew.

In the shed

Ladies in waiting, protected by guardian dog puppies

ewes and puppies

Oscar helping a lamb find a mom with a skin graft

Edgar and Oscar conferring

plenty of feed on hand

Oscar with his lambing crew, Tiarnan and Seamus

Babies in a box,
waiting for milk replacer,
or a new mama

Luis feeding a baby lamb

 

 

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Snow and Sage

 

 Sagebrush humped under
albino buffalo robes–
Waiting out winter.

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2018 in Nature and Wildlife, Poetry

 

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Sandman

Sandman, climbing

 

The stony sandman

Eternally strives to climb,

Rain or snow or shine.

 
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Posted by on February 25, 2018 in Nature and Wildlife, Poetry

 

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Winter lilacs

Sunset

 

Lilac blooms will come

Lush, fragrant, heralding spring…

Now red with sunset.

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2018 in Nature and Wildlife, Poetry

 

Cows on the Laramie Plains

 

 

Many of us may not think of Laramie as the ideal wintering grounds, but for our cows, it is…Laradise!

Laradise

 
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Posted by on February 16, 2018 in Animals, Cattle

 

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What goes in must come out

The bucks have finished their winter work.

 

It’s a buck’s life. These boys only work six weeks a year, but it’s an important six weeks. Without them, we would have no baby lambs in the spring. Of course, it falls to the ewes to be pregnant for five months, and then to spend another five months or so raising lambs.

As for the bucks, they are ready for some rest. In a few weeks, they start looking for something to do, which usually involves trying to escape wherever we want them to be. They were glad to see the ewes on Cyclone Rim in mid-December, but now it’s time for them to leave the ewes and return to their bachelor ways. They go home the same way they left–one horsetrailer at a time.

Guillermo, Tiarnan, McCoy, Rhen and Seamus bringing the bucks up

up the chute

Oscar and Guillermo loading the trailer

Oscar and Guillermo and the loaded trailer

last buck jumping out

Home at last! Here are the bucks with fresh hay in the Mouse Pasture.

 

 
 

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Through a lens, iPhonely

Winter sheep with southerly sun

Pat’s birthday present was a new set of lenses for his iPhone. Here’s some photos he took at Powder Wash trying out the new lenses. Watch this space for future pics.

If the blackface and some of the whiteface ewes look roundish in these photos, that’s because they will start lambing in a month or so. You can also see how little snow there is. The winter continues to be warm and dry, and we continuously check the weather report for promises of snow. My Dad always said that a wet spring beats a hard winter, so we can hope!

 

Powder Mountain

ewes on the feed line

Powder Rim

Which one of these is not like the others? (Hint–look at the color of the ears.)

Cattle and sheep co-existing symbiotically

H

 

 

 

 
 

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