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Docking 2017

Belle helping the humans

Go that-a-way!

When most of the lambs are on the ground, we are faced with the next big task–docking. This is a major job which involves handling each and every lamb which has recently been born–giving it an earmark, castrating it if it is a male, judging if it is replacement quality if it is a female, vaccinating for enterotoxemia and tetanus, cutting the tail, and last, but not least, stamping on a paint brand. This operation involves a lot of moving parts with a lot of coordination of critters and people. It calls for all hands and the cook!

Heading into the corral

Bringing up the ewes

Docking crew ready to go

McCoy, with the docking crew and the Dinkum Docker

Siobhan taking a break

Rhen and Tiarnan–the happy dockers!

 

Tyler, German, Juan and Rafael at the docking board

German holds lamb while Kimmy castrates

Jaime putting a lamb into the Dinkum Docker

Tyler and Jaime

the multi-talented Kimmy vaccinating

Rhen branding for Pepe

Brittany counting tails

After the docking

Luka supervising lunch

Time for rest and contemplation of tails

 

 

 

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No Bull!

Cows gather at the Elephant corrals

Cows gather at the Elephant corrals

 

 

Each June, we artificially inseminate a selected group of cows to famous bulls–or at least their “on ice” reproductive avatars.

Crew at the ready

Crew at the ready

 

Thanks to Eamon’s crew, including his cowhand sidekicks Jeff (his father-in-law), Mike and Karen Buchanan (who have returned to cow work after retiring), intrepid ranchhand Brittany, and Eamon’s wife, Megan (on-site medic). The AI crew included his sister-in-law, Halli. And not to be forgotten is his mother-in-law, Georgia, who wrangled McCoy, 4, and Rhen, 2.

cow in chute

so WHERE’S the bull???

Oh wait--it's Alan!

Oh wait–it’s Adam!

Megan from the AI crew (left) and Megan from the Ladder crew (right)

Megan from the AI crew (left) and Megan from the Ladder crew (right)

feeling pregnant

feeling pregnant

McCoy

the real McCoy

Georgia with Rhen

Georgia on the job with Rhen (dirty job but somebody has to do it!)

 

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Brittany and her one true love!

It's a beautiful thing!!!

It’s a beautiful thing!!!

 
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Posted by on June 6, 2015 in Animals, Dogs, Folks who help us out

 

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Lambing time

Bum lambs--sometimes we have more lambs than mamas with available milk

Bum lambs–sometimes we have more lambs than mamas with available milk

goat mama fostering lambs

goat mama fostering lambs

For many years, our lambs have been born on the open range, under the care of herders. Lambs usually come into the world under one of three management systems. Shed lambing calls for a lot of management, and a lot of labor, as the new moms and baby lambs are brought into the protection of sheds, and placed in “jugs” (little pens). In the past, we have lambed in sheds in March. We raise our own rams and for a number of years, we have shed lambed our farm flocks of Rambouillet  and Hampshire ewes, who are the moms of the replacement bucks.

Most of our ewes “drop lamb.” Pregnant ewes are tended by herders. Each morning and evening, they ride through the sheep and “cut the drop.” This means that the ewes with brand-new lambs are “dropped” back, while the still pregnant ewes are moved ahead to fresh ground. This requires a large landscape, with the ewes scattered among sage and grass. In a few days, the ewes and their baby lambs have had a chance to “mother up” and are gathered into a bunch. When these flocks of ewes and lambs are put together, and the lambs are docked, they will trail on up to the Forest for the summer months.

The third way of lambing is open range lambing. Some producers with large tracts of private land build tight fences, concentrate on predator control, and let the ewes lamb without assistance.

Shed lambing saves the most lambs, due to one-on-one (or two, or three, or even four) attention. Drop lambing still involves a lot of labor, and has the advantage of keeping the sheep on clean ground. The herders ride through the sheep constantly and help any that require assistance. The disadvantage of drop lambing is vulnerability to bad weather, and increased exposure to predators, from coyotes to ravens. The weather has been more volatile the past few years, with spring storms killing hundreds and hundreds of lambs.

In an attempt to reduce our losses to weather, we have constructed a couple of large sheds in the last two years.  The investment in infrastructure has been considerable, but our goal is to save lambs, and give ourselves, and the sheep, more protection against the vagaries of weather. This involves a lot of work for us and our employees.

On the range and in the sheds, our employees and family members are working to keep the ewes and lambs healthy. It has rained every day since we started lambing, and we are lambing in the wool, due to the shearing contractor not showing up. Even the ranch cook has helped out, after bringing hot lunches to the shed every day. Way to go, crew!

Brittany, all-around ranch hand, bringing ewes and lambs in from the corral.

Brittany, all-around ranch hand, bringing ewes and lambs in from the corral.

 

ewe and lambs get a ride in the bucket--a speedy ride to the shed

ewe and lambs get a ride in the bucket–a speedy ride to the shed

Lambing shed full of jugs and lambs

Lambing shed full of jugs and lambs

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Two-year-old ewe with triplets

 

Pepe, real men fill pink water buckets

new shed, waiting for tenants

new shed, waiting for tenants

Pepe putting a skin graft on a lamb to be adopted by a new mom

Pepe putting a skin graft on a lamb to be adopted by a new mom

Antonio, drop lambing on Muddy Mountain

Drop lambing on Muddy Mountain

Antonio helps a ewe on the Loco lambing ground

Antonio helps a ewe on the Loco lambing ground

Rain, sleet, snow--intrepid lamber!

Rain, sleet, snow–intrepid lamber!

Adolfo, Avencio, Brittany, Pepe, Julia, Benoit, Filo, Eduardo, Leo

Adolfo, Avencio, Brittany, Pepe, Julia, Benoit, Filo, Eduardo, Leo–our French house guests helped out too!

 

Julia and Benoit--Au Revoir

Julia and Benoit–Au Revoir

 

 

 

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Branding days

Three amigos ready for branding

Three amigos ready for branding

It’s the time of year to brand the calves. We have a mixed crew–all ages, but generally experienced. Here are photos from three brandings–hence the varied backdrops.  When we branded the desert calves at the McCullem Place, our long-time (not “old”!) friend Mike Buchanan helped us. Mike worked for my Dad back in the day, and spent a number of years managing the wild horse training program at the Wyoming Honor Farm. He’s back to cowboying now, in his spare time. When I introduced him to our young ranchhand, Cody said, “Mike Buchanan!  Everyone’s heard of him!”.

Most of the calves are branded, but we have lots of spring work ahead of us. We have had great rains, after an open winter. We were worried about the drought, but for now, we have blessed green grass growing.

Cody and Mike, ready to rope calves

Cody and Mike, ready to rope calves

Cody, Eamon and Mike

Cody, Eamon and Mike

Pat, tending the irons

Pat, tending the irons

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Randel and Brittant rassling

Randel and Brittany rassling

Meghan and Tiarnan

Meghan and Tiarnan

Seamus and Tiarnan, ready to help

Seamus and Tiarnan, ready to help (with McCoy a’horseback)

Siobhan briging in a calf

Siobhan bringing in a calf

Cody and Jayce at the McCullem Place

Cody and Jayce at the McCullem Place

bringing in the cows and calves

bringing in the cows and calves

 
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Posted by on May 16, 2015 in Animals, Cattle, Events, Horses

 

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Calves after snow

Cows and calves with Battle Mountain

Cows and calves with Battle Mountain

Calf, posing

Calf, posing

Sheep Mountain with a frost of snow

Sheep Mountain with a frost of snow

Lucky Butte over the Little Snake

Lucky Butte over the Little Snake

Cowboy crew--Rhen, Eamon, Cody, Britteny, Brenden, Amy, McCoy, Megan, Amy

Cowboy crew–Rhen, Eamon, Cody, Brittany, Brenden, Amy, McCoy, Megan, Amy

 

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Out like a ram: sorting the bucks

Edgar checking the bucks

Edgar checking the bucks

The bucks have done their job and are back on the Home Ranch for another ten months of bachelorhood.  It’s easy enough for them. In the meantime, the ewes carry their pregnancy to term, trail 100 miles or so, get sheared, and have their lambs. The ewes then trail to the Forest with their lambs, raise them–dodging coyotes, bears and ravens, and trail back to the ranch for weaning.

Some of the rams have given their all, and won’t make it to another breeding season. We sorted out the bucks who are old, thin, and/or no teeth, These will be sold and are destined to be buckburgers or dog food.

The rams do lead a good life, and we take care of them until the end.

Brittany, Meghan and Katie checking teeth

Brittany, Meghan and Katie checking teeth

Tiarnan and Meghan

Tiarnan and Meghan

crew: Katie, Brittany, Randy, Tiarnan, Meghan, bucks, Randall, Cody, and Edgar

crew: Katie, Brittany, Randy, Tiarnan, Meghan, bucks, Randall, Cody, and Edgar

 

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